Essential Cookie Ingredients And What They Do

Posted in on the 30th June, 2013

Baking cookies would be a lot easier if you now the ingredients and what they do. The essence of making that perfect cookie is knowing how to mix up the ingredients the right way in order to come up with the expected result. This requires knowledge on what the different ingredients used in cookies contribute to create that desired result. Here are some of the things that you should know about.

Flour

The basic ingredient of cookies, the type and amount of flour used can have different results. Most cookie recipes require all-purpose or pastry flour. But there are also cookies that use cake flour and bread flour, usually for cookies that tend to spread less. Spread refers to the property of the cookie to retain its shape or flatten while being cooked in the oven. To get that crumbly texture for your cookies, a higher flour to liquid ratio is needed.

FEssential-Cookie-Ingredients-And-What-They-Doats

Fats such as butter, margarine or shortening tend to affect the spread of the cookie. More fats tend to make it flatter while less fat results in puffier cookies. Shortening and margarine are considered as more stable and tend to help cookies retain their original unbaked shapes. Butter on the other hand tends to melt at body temperature and is ideal for use with cookies that tend to spread out or flatten.

Sugar

Sugar not only sweetens the cookie but also affects its texture. As sugar also melts in the oven, the type and amount also affects how the cookie will come out once done. Using white sugar results in crispier cookies. Using brown sugar makes a cookie stay chewy as it tends to absorb moisture after baking. Lowering the amount of sugar in a recipe can result in puffier cookies.

Baking Soda and Baking Powder

Baking soda and baking powder are two of the most common leaveners used in making cookies. Baking soda is just bicarbonate of soda while baking powder is a combination of bicarbonate of soda and cream of tartar. Using baking soda results in brown cookies while using baking powder will result in puffier and whiter cookies after baking.

Baking cookies would be a lot easier if you now the ingredients and what they do. The essence of making that perfect cookie is knowing how to mix up the ingredients the right way in order to come up with the expected result. This requires knowledge on what the different ingredients used in cookies contribute to create that desired result. Here are some of the things that you should know about.


The basic ingredient of cookies, the type and amount of flour used can have different results. Most cookie recipes require all-purpose or pastry flour. But there are also cookies that use cake flour and bread flour, usually for cookies that tend to spread less. Spread refers to the property of the cookie to retain its shape or flatten while being cooked in the oven. To get that crumbly texture for your cookies, a higher flour to liquid ratio is needed.

Fats

Fats such as butter, margarine or shortening tend to affect the spread of the cookie. More fats tend to make it flatter while less fat results in puffier cookies. Shortening and margarine are considered as more stable and tend to help cookies retain their original unbaked shapes. Butter on the other hand tends to melt at body temperature and is ideal for use with cookies that tend to spread out or flatten.

Sugar

Sugar not only sweetens the cookie but also affects its texture. As sugar also melts in the oven, the type and amount also affects how the cookie will come out once done. Using white sugar results in crispier cookies. Using brown sugar makes a cookie stay chewy as it tends to absorb moisture after baking. Lowering the amount of sugar in a recipe can result in puffier cookies.

Baking Soda and Baking Powder

Baking soda and baking powder are two of the most common leaveners used in making cookies. Baking soda is just bicarbonate of soda while baking powder is a combination of bicarbonate of soda and cream of tartar. Using baking soda results in brown cookies while using baking powder will result in puffier and whiter cookies after baking.

Eggs and Liquids

Eggs are considered as binding agents that help cookies retain their shape while liquids are used to either puff up the cookie or help it spread. Using either the egg yolk or the egg white can also affect the baking results. Using primarily egg yolks can add richness to the cookie and give it a crisp texture. Using only egg whites tend to make cookies dry and lumpy. To make up for the drying effect of egg whites, extra sugar is often added.

Eggs are considered as binding agents that help cookies retain their shape while liquids are used to either puff up the cookie or help it spread. Using either the egg yolk or the egg white can also affect the baking results. Using primarily egg yolks can add richness to the cookie and give it a crisp texture. Using only egg whites tend to make cookies dry and lumpy. To make up for the drying effect of egg whites, extra sugar is often added.